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Thread: 405nm Projector

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Los Angeles
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    Default 405nm Projector

    Hello,

    Curious if anyone here owns, or is aware of a commercially available projector incorporating 405nm diodes (5+ Watts). Working on a project which requires 4 of them at the moment, so we're looking into getting a few made, however have an event towards the end of the month, so might be looking for a more expedited solution for the next show.

    Thanks!
    -Griffin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Cleveland Ohio
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    Default

    5w 405nm should be called the “melanoma projector”

  3. #3
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    Jan 2006
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    Charleston, SC
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    5 watts of 405nm? That would be quite the stack of diodes, no?

    What is the most you can get out of a 405 diode these days? Maybe 800 mw? So, 6 diodes? That definitely sounds like a custom build...

    Adam

  4. #4
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    Feb 2011
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    Default

    Yes, it does seem like it would be a custom situation. Hopefully not too far out of the box once all things are considered, looks like the appropriate optics exist. Can you think of any US manufacturers (or individuals) who would be good candidates for this project? Looks like there have been a few RGBV builds in the past, so I may reach out to those guys.

    @kecked - Yes, ironically the original thought for these projectors was to use an even shorter wavelength, which would certainly entitle it to that name. These definitely won't be used for AS.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Fort Mill, SC USA
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    I suppose I'm the UV (technically near-uv as 405nm isn't quite UV) projector guy. I have built about a dozen to date in a variety of flavors including RGBVV, VV/IR, VVR, and RRGGBBVV.

    Building a 405nm projector is as straight-forward as any other build for the most part. One unique aspect of my builds approach is incorporating the ability to project 'less focused' 405nm for soft fill effects. Here's a video of the process:



    Here's another video further highlighting the detail possible with single mode 405 diodes:


    Getting 3-5W of 405nm is certainly possible by stacking diodes or otherwise combining corrected multi-mode 405nm diodes, but with increased power comes increased beam size. You are welcome to contact me by PM if you'd like to discuss your requirements in more detail.

    -David
    Last edited by dkumpula; 05-09-2019 at 03:49.
    "Help, help, I'm being repressed!"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    St. Louis, MO
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    Very nice! (15 chars)
    "There are painters who transform the sun into a yellow spot, but there are others who, with the help of their art and their intelligence, transform a yellow spot into the sun." Pablo Picasso

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Charleston, SC
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    Quote Originally Posted by laserist View Post
    Very nice! (15 chars)
    You think it's impressive on video? Come to SELEM and you can see this effect demonstrated live in person. (And holy hell is it amazing to watch!)

    Seriously: for anyone who will be at SELEM this year, you owe it to yourself to wander over to the foyer area near the auditorium entrance where David will have this display set up again. He's got several different shows that he can run, and they all look amazing! After the image is completely drawn you can approach the canvas and inspect the detail close-up. You won't believe how complex some of these are!

    This is one of the most innovative laser effects I've ever seen. And while I appreciate the image/music pairing for the bumblebee, the peacock is my favorite.

    Adam

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Fort Mill, SC USA
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    Thanks guys, that's kind of you both. I've got new GITD (Glow in the Dark) stuff to show at SELEM this year as well. Anyone that wants to try their own image is welcome to use my rig. Basically the blue channel is for tight lines and green is used for defocused fill. The diodes are analog modulated so you can do grey scale images as well, albeit its more green-scale with the paint I use.

    -David
    "Help, help, I'm being repressed!"

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