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Thread: LED Laser Hybrid Optic System In Action

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Default LED Laser Hybrid Optic System In Action

    Got an interesting inspiration to put up some pics showing the actual optics core exposed showing a LED Laser Hybrid systems in actual operation when I was pulling apart a larger version of the compact optics package the other day for just some pics like those of the smaller compact package. Looks near the same design just more spread out and that thought popped in my mind maybe something of the way these are working might be of interest or use. Anyway I will post up more shots as need to work out better ambient lighting as well as a more vapor to bring out beams or dens cores of the light after the phosphor wheel which pretty much is the last sign of coherence and then it is just more dense cores lik pipes of light when I hit them right with the vapor of blue/red mix and going the other way the green before they both bounce at 45 and merge. Let me know fi there is any shots that might be more useful or just interesting to get and I will try and wok some in when I can get a good light mixture without completely washing out or blinding me as I have my units for blue as they are the are them most hazardous but the amount of green these things pump out after hitting the phosphor wheel is really insane. Anyway here are the first few shots.




















  2. #2
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    Feb 2015
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    DTR,

    So, I'm just guessing, but this is the light engine from one of the newer laser-light-source video projectors? Fascinating! I hadn't realized that the green was being produced by fluorescence. That must be a pretty efficient conversion. These projectors, though still a bit pricey, are amazing for their light output, size and durability (no dangerous explosive and expensive arc lamps to change - ever!). Where I work we're about to swap out a gargantuan two-lamp 5000 lumen projector for a much smaller 15,000 lumen laser projector. These will revolutionize the industry.

    Thanks for your photos and insights.

    Ron

  3. #3
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    ... this is the "colour-mechanism" of the old Casio XJ-beamers, which were in thousands salvaged for the first blue 1Watt-laserdiodes (24 of them in the "laser-block") ... have some of them (XJ-A130 and XJ-A230 with hgher resolution).

    Actually similar beamers use 8 laserdiodes in the block and the diodes emits around 4.5Watts each (maybe up to 8Watts each) ...

    Viktor
    Aufruf zum Projekt "Müll-freie Meere" - https://reprap.org/forum/list.php?426
    Call for the project "garbage-free seas" - https://reprap.org/forum/list.php?425

  4. #4
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    The quantum efficiency of that blue to green conversion must be incredible to make this worth doing. Sort of a solid state dye laser that isn’t a laser🙄. What do you do with the wheels? I might like to try using sunlight to see if I can convert enough blue down to drive solar cells that are more efficient in the green that blues ( seriously doubt the better matched band gap efficiency change will be made up after the conversion loss) Curious what the phosphorus is or if it is fluorescence instead. Does it continue to glow once you remove light? Too bad they dont have a good red for the same method. One blue stack to rule them all.

    whats in the silver metal box two pictures from the last?

  5. #5
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    ... it's not this efficient - the 24x blue laserdiodes in this beamers combined roughly 12Watt of blue and the red LED was 3Watts or such -- so you'll need around 3 Watts of (converted) green and have to dim the blue if not used for the conversion.

    The "silver box" contains 4 mirror stripes, which simply "average" the light by scattering while bouncing between the mirrors ...

    Viktor
    Aufruf zum Projekt "Müll-freie Meere" - https://reprap.org/forum/list.php?426
    Call for the project "garbage-free seas" - https://reprap.org/forum/list.php?425

  6. #6
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    Thanks for that. I figured no free lunch Sounds like the green diodes would be much better. Wonder why they are not used. Three green diodes would all you need. 8 mits reds and you got all diode.

  7. #7
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    Back with the casio greenslim came out direct green diodes were about 20mw max power, I do not even think you could get a high power green one for scientific applications.

    There was one pure-laser based technology available back then which was DPSS based and incredibly expensive (about $10k for a reverse projection tv using the technology, I don't think it was available as a projector presumably for safety reasons) and never really caught on. The green slim really was revolutionary in being able to bring the cost of a laser based light engine, including despeckle and all the other laser necessities, into the consumer market.

    Today you can get pure-laser based projectors which are much brighter than the hybrid laser/led systems, all of the way up to the 100k+ lumen 6-color '3D' laser systems used in movie theaters--assuming you have a million bucks laying around

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by krazer View Post
    There was one pure-laser based technology available back then which was DPSS based and incredibly expensive (about $10k for a reverse projection tv using the technology, I don't think it was available as a projector presumably for safety reasons)
    Hi,
    With DLP the beam is spread to the diameter of the micromirror (0.2''-0.9'') and then spread out into a projection beam going through the projection lenses. The pixels are generated by the DLP chip spatially modulating that wide beam. The beam isn't a dangerous collimated beam scanning the pixels or scanlines one-by-one. So I don't think the issue was safety, probably speckle.
    Another possibility is the DPSS was generating UV spectrum laser beam and the rear-projection TV had RGB color phosphor subpixels which would eliminate speckle.

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