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Thread: ReLux -LED Light Bulb Replacments

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    Lightbulb ReLux -LED Light Bulb Replacments

    Hello everyone my Name is Tyler Le Dent. I may have met some of you, while I worked @ Laser Fantasy International. I was the head of the Manufacturing department for many years. I started in 1996 and worked there for almost a decade. I am still in the laser entertainment working with Jeff Silverman of Nth Degree Creative in Everett doing theme parks and rock and roll touring. We have discovered a new source of light. LED light bulb Replacement. We are the manufacturers of the ReLux product line. Check us out @ ReLux.com


    Do you hate those pesky power bills? Me too. We are offering special pricing to laser folks.

    Cheers,
    Tyler Le Dent

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    LED technology sure is nice, but unfortunately prohibitively expensive as well right now. I made the calculation to see how long it would take until you actually start saving money on the 20W LED. The "cold white" is roughly equivalent to a 60W incandescent light bulb in radiative power (the 60W bulb is a little more luminous). Assuming an electricity cost of $0.15/kWh, replacement bulb cost of $2.50 and 1000 h bulb lifetime it would take about 15000 hours or 1.7 years of continuous use. I don't think any of my lamps have been on for that long.

    Now, it doesn't have to be that way. Your products have a rather low luminous efficacy compared to other LEDs. Most modern LEDs are around the 100lm/W mark, some even higher. I don't know if you're stating the external (outlet to light exiting the aperture) or internal luminous efficacy (LED only). In either case, you need to improve the efficiency of the device. Don't let yourself get beaten by fluorescent lights. Replace whatever LEDs you're using now with for example SSC P7 LEDs.

    Sorry if this comes across a critical post. I am in the solar power industry myself, so I'm in a similar situation.

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    LEDs are only a tiny bit more efficient than CFLs. They don't contain mercury, but they do contain arsenic and all sorts of other nasty crap. Semiconductor manufacture is not a happy clean thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by heroic View Post
    LEDs are only a tiny bit more efficient than CFLs. They don't contain mercury, but they do contain arsenic and all sorts of other nasty crap. Semiconductor manufacture is not a happy clean thing.

    Mark my words, Metal Halide is a technology that should not be passed over like it is now. 20 years of stalled development by politics and greed, and the big lighting companies idea of "tungsten forever", so they would sell more bulbs, has left it a underused technology. Far less enviro damage to make a halide compared to a led.

    CFLs have some serious issues when used in residential environments, power factor being one of them. Wait till all that excess reactance hits a system that (in the US at Least) is balanced for resistive load. I'm willing to bet that as carbon caps hit, you start seeing a reactive load segment on your utility bill.

    I just got hired to work on LED based lighting, so I too feel your pain. We're shooting for a mil/industrial specialty market, so not so bad.





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    Arc lamps in their various forms are certainly interesting, but can they retain their high efficiency as they're scaled down? They also have the problem of requiring a driver, but I guess electronic ballasts can be made fairly small.

    Quote Originally Posted by heroic View Post
    LEDs are only a tiny bit more efficient than CFLs. They don't contain mercury, but they do contain arsenic and all sorts of other nasty crap. Semiconductor manufacture is not a happy clean thing.
    White LEDs shouldn't contain any arsenic. They're basically just blue emitters with a yellow phosphor and blue emitters aren't arsenic-based. I'm guessing you don't want any arsenic in them as that would make the band gap too narrow. The chemicals used in the actual deposition process aren't very nice though, but fortunately they're readily hydrolyzed or oxidized in the atmosphere, so they only pose a danger in the immediate vicinity of the plant.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mixedgas View Post
    Mark my words, Metal Halide is a technology that should not be passed over like it is now. 20 years of stalled development by politics and greed, and the big lighting companies idea of "tungsten forever", so they would sell more bulbs, has left it a underused technology. Far less enviro damage to make a halide compared to a led.

    CFLs have some serious issues when used in residential environments, power factor being one of them. Wait till all that excess reactance hits a system that (in the US at Least) is balanced for resistive load. I'm willing to bet that as carbon caps hit, you start seeing a reactive load segment on your utility bill.

    I just got hired to work on LED based lighting, so I too feel your pain. We're shooting for a mil/industrial specialty market, so not so bad.

    Steve
    I love my 150W 10,000k HQI Metal Halide with Electronic Ballast, originally for my fish tank an coral (you try moving with a fish tank, after two times I have no more fish tank). I love the HQI and electronic ballast efficiency, just make sure you have a UV filter! With any luck I will be building a nice LCD projector with it (too bad the parabolic reflector ain't that great with the fresnels, dark on the edges) but all that is another forum .

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    Quote Originally Posted by tocket View Post
    They also have the problem of requiring a driver
    as do LEDs.

    Quote Originally Posted by mixedgas View Post
    Mark my words, Metal Halide is a technology that should not be passed over like it is now.
    I love halides! I even light my basement with them.

    Quote Originally Posted by tocket View Post
    Arc lamps in their various forms are certainly interesting, but can they retain their high efficiency as they're scaled down?
    at 50W, HPS is about 80lm/W and Halide is about 70lm/W (not including ballast losses). Even with ballast losses, that's better than CFLs. I haven't really seen any lower than 50W or so. But that's when you switch to CFLs. At the moment, LEDs are only viable when you need to turn the light on and off often or have a very low power need (like an indicator lamp). Any other light source hates that besides tungsten.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xytrell View Post

    at 50W, HPS is about 80lm/W and Halide is about 70lm/W (not including ballast losses).
    30 and 25W metal halide HIDs are commonly used in car headlamps; the 30W types produce about 2000 lumens. That puts them a little lower than yout 70lm/W but not too bad.

    The efficiency of a short arc lamp goes as the ratio between volume and surface area of the plasma; the cube-square law bites.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tocket View Post
    LED technology sure is nice, but unfortunately prohibitively expensive as well right now. I made the calculation to see how long it would take until you actually start saving money on the 20W LED. The "cold white" is roughly equivalent to a 60W incandescent light bulb in radiative power (the 60W bulb is a little more luminous). Assuming an electricity cost of $0.15/kWh, replacement bulb cost of $2.50 and 1000 h bulb lifetime it would take about 15000 hours or 1.7 years of continuous use. I don't think any of my lamps have been on for that long.

    Now, it doesn't have to be that way. Your products have a rather low luminous efficacy compared to other LEDs. Most modern LEDs are around the 100lm/W mark, some even higher. I don't know if you're stating the external (outlet to light exiting the aperture) or internal luminous efficacy (LED only). In either case, you need to improve the efficiency of the device. Don't let yourself get beaten by fluorescent lights. Replace whatever LEDs you're using now with for example SSC P7 LEDs.

    Sorry if this comes across a critical post. I am in the solar power industry myself, so I'm in a similar situation.

    Wow I'm sorry you guys. It looks like our Web guy has mixed up the specks up on the ReLux 20W LED with anotherone of our products. I appreciate your input as this helps me correct the problem. We did evaluate the light after the lense so you are right our LED specks are quite lower than other products on the market. I will get the update specks with Internal efficancies as soon as I can to keep the comparisons to other available products easy to decypher.


    I don't know about you guys, but I am ready to invest in the future of the planet. I understand your knee jerk price point issues. We can chat about the enviornmental investment later

    Lets look at a one bulb investment senerio with your figures.

    If you buy a $100 LED bulb after 1.7 years its free to you, and yours to keep. By the way it is scheduled to last 5 X longer than that. With an estimated lifespan of 100,000 hours. Some time in the year 2020 your LED bulb will have lived its life. You will have saved $500 on your energy bill. That is 5 times your initial investment in your future on Planet Earth.

    If you change every bulb in your home and office lets say 20 bulbs. If left them on 24/7 in the year 2020 you will save $10,000 in energy bills.

    Can someone check my math its late and this # dosn't sound right.

    I gotta tell you we have converted our Laser manufacturing facility to LED and we are enjoying the difference that coherent light brings to the room. One of the beautiful things about LED lighting is that you can see the heat signature that different objects in the room are producing with respect to there shadow. Best wishes to all you fello laser guys.

    Cheers,
    Tyler Le Dent
    Nth Degree Creative

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    Quote Originally Posted by Laserfro View Post
    One of the beautiful things about LED lighting is that you can see the heat signature that different objects in the room are producing with respect to there shadow.
    No you can't. That's absolute nonsense.

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